TLG Facelift; Updates to Perseus

Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) has been updated with a new look. From the website:

The TLG site has just been updated. The new site was designed by Marcie Hague. Cindy Moore put the finishing touches and added the extensions to the TLG databases. The new page includes a brief history of the TLG illustrated by a timeline, a link to Google Maps showing TLG Real-Time Access and FAQs for subscribers. The Abridged version has been expanded with more than 600 works from Migne’s Patrologia Graeca (MPG). The lemmatized search engine is now available on the Abridged version.

The full-version of TLG is only available to subscribers or individuals who are using their institution’s subscription. As the paragraph above mentions, however, there is an abridged version that is available to all which includes a subset of the works available in the subscription version (which now includes over 600 works from Migne’s Patrologia Graeca.

My co-blogger on the BibleWorks blog, Michael Hanel, reports that Perseus has recently made some updates to its library (see here). In addition to a new job announcement at Perseus, there have also been some improvements and additions:

  • Many improvements to the Art & Archaeology data and interface. You can now search the A&A data and image captions.
  • Euclid’s Elements have been added, as well as a large number of Plutarch texts, edited by Bernadotte Perrin. Links to these texts can be found on the Greek and Roman collection page.

Here are links to the additions from Euclid:

Below is a full list of the items added in Plutarch:

Panoramic Views on 360cities.net


Ephesus in Ephesus

I stumbled upon 360cities.net – an interesting site. In essence, it collects 360 degree panoramic views of various locations throughout the world, cataloged by location and linked with Google Maps. Point and click on the image above to move the picture around (both to the left and the right and up and down). This site has a great deal of potential for teachers. It allows you to virtually step inside a location and look around.

Here’s what the site says about itself:

Bringing the world to a wide audience in a new way, 360cities.net is a guide that lets you step inside. We bring the full spectrum of high-resolution immersive, virtual reality experience to the web. 360 Cities brings you closer to the reality of a place than has ever been possible before…

The site’s pretty nifty. The image embedded above is of ruins in Ephesus (Turkey). Below are some links to other countries of interest.

Here’s the page that’s for the Middle East in general.

There’s a similar downloadable program that is available for free from Ted Hildebrandt (professor at Gordon College in Wenham, Mass.). Get Lost in Jerusalem (550 MB download) provides similar 360 degree views of various locations in Jerusalem that allow you to take a virtual tour. If you don’t know about Ted’s Biblical eSources site, you need to take a look. He has some absolutely fantastic resources available! His bibliography on Proverbs is a thing of beauty!

OT in the NT with BibleWorks

Mark Vitalis Hoffman of Luther Theological Seminary has put together a tutorial on the use of the Old Testament in Matthew 4:4. In this PowerPoint tutorial, he demonstrates how to use BibleWorks 7 to investigate the various issues with interpreting the OT in the NT. (See his blog post.) I have not had a chance to check out the presentation, but given that the topic is on “oldinthenew” and BibleWorks (2 of my favorite things), I figured that it would be good to give everyone a heads up.

I hope we see more of this kind of tutorial in the future.

Link: OT in the NT: Matt 4:4-Learning to work with resources

ten reasons why to drop your cell phone

I’ve never had one, and as long as I can, I never will. Now I’ve got ten reasons not to! Rob Beschizza at the Wired Blogs Gadget Lab has given “ten reasons why to drop your cell phone”:

  1. It makes your life more complicated
  2. It’s horribly expensive
  3. It enslaves you to a one-sided contract
  4. It makes you perpetually available
  5. It is boring
  6. It must constantly be recharged
  7. It knows where you are
  8. It encourages stupid people to become a public menace
  9. Ubiquitous pleather accessory shops
  10. It turns you into a public annoyance

For the complete list and his explanation, see his post.

“Lay aside every weight” and get rid of your cell phone!

(HT Lifehacker)

Doing History in a Digital Age

While the journal Perspectives does not cover theology or biblical studies, the articles in its May 2007 issue may be of interest to bibliobloggers. The issue centers on the topic “History and the Changing Landscape of Information.” It may be worth taking a gander. For those who have decried the inaccuracies of Wikipedia, there’s an interesting article by a scholar who uses Wikipedia entries as a vehicle for teaching. See “Strange Facts in the History Classroom: Or How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Wiki(pedia),” by Christopher Miller. The entire issue is available online.